Pregnancy Risk and Biopolitics

In this fascinating book Lorna Weir argues that the displacement of birth as the threshold of the living subject began in the 1950s with the novel concept of ‘perinatal mortality’ referring to death of either the foetus or the newborn ...

Pregnancy  Risk and Biopolitics

Traditionally, Euroamerican cultures have considered that human status was conferred at the conclusion to childbirth. However, in contemporary Euroamerican biomedicine, law and politics, the living subject is often claimed to pre-exist birth. In this fascinating book Lorna Weir argues that the displacement of birth as the threshold of the living subject began in the 1950s with the novel concept of ‘perinatal mortality’ referring to death of either the foetus or the newborn just prior to, during or after birth. Weir’s book gives a new feminist approach to pregnancy in advanced modernity focusing on the governance of population. She traces the introduction of the perinatal threshold into child welfare and tort law through expert testimony on foetal risk, sketching the clash at law between the birth and perinatal thresholds of the living subject. Her book makes original empirical and theoretical contributions to the history of the present (Foucauldian research), feminism, and social studies of risk, and she conceptualizes a new historical focus for the history of the present: the threshold of the living subject. Calling attention to the significance of population politics, especially the reduction of infant mortality, for the unsettling of the birth threshold, this book argues that risk techniques are heterogeneous, contested with expertise, and plural in their political effects. Interview research with midwives shows their critical relation to using risk assessment in clinical practice. An original and accessible study, this book will be of great interest to students and researchers across many disciplines.

More Books:

Pregnancy, Risk and Biopolitics
Language: en
Pages: 256
Authors: Lorna Weir
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2006-09-27 - Publisher: Routledge

Traditionally, Euroamerican cultures have considered that human status was conferred at the conclusion to childbirth. However, in contemporary Euroamerican biomedicine, law and politics, the living subject is often claimed to pre-exist birth. In this fascinating book Lorna Weir argues that the displacement of birth as the threshold of the living
Risk, Pregnancy and Childbirth
Language: en
Pages: 190
Authors: Kirstie Coxon, Mandie Scamell, Andy Alaszewski
Categories: Health & Fitness
Type: BOOK - Published: 2018-10-11 - Publisher: Routledge

Over the last hundred years, pregnancy and childbirth has become increasingly safe – yet it is still a site of risk, and a contested ground on which health professionals and pregnant women both face high costs of error. In this context, all those involved in managing pregnancy and birth are
Biopolitical Governance
Language: en
Pages: 272
Authors: Hannah Richter
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2018-05-17 - Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

This collection brings together contributions from both established scholars and researchers working at the forefront of biopolitical theory, gendered and sexualised governance and the politics of race and migration.
Gendered Risks
Language: en
Pages: 272
Authors: Kelly Hannah-Moffat, Pat O'Malley
Categories: Law
Type: BOOK - Published: 2007-11-13 - Publisher: Routledge

Edited and contributed to by a collection of eminent international scholars in the field, this is the first book to explore the gendered aspects of risk. It analyzes what is currently known and identifies some of the new directions and challenges for research and theory that emerge from thinking of
The Virtues of Vulnerability
Language: en
Pages: 240
Authors: Sara Rushing
Categories: Political Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2020-11-20 - Publisher: Oxford University Press

Within the liberal tradition, the physical body has been treated as a focus of rights discussion and a source of economic and democratic value; it needs protection but it is also one's dominion, tool, and property, and thus something over which we should be able to exercise free will. However,